Resources about MMIWG

In 2016, the National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls took place to examine and report on this violence against Indigenous women and girls. Since then, books have been published about the families affected by these crimes, as well as the stories of investigations that took place. These truths should not be forgotten.

Reads that remind us about diversity

Intersectionality acknowledges that no one is any one thing, and various facets of identity can combine to change how someone sees and interacts with the world. And they’re worth reading for reasons beyond being able to slap a label—BIPOC, gay, disabled, all of the above—on the author or characters, and worth more than serving as a tool for readers to congratulate themselves for reading “diversely.” Read these books because they are great stories that expand your understanding of the human experience.

Decolonize your bookshelf

Bear explains that some people like to think of Indigenous communities as something from the past or, as author Thomas King called it, “the dead Indian,” a stereotype of the Indigenous person living in a teepee with a headdress on, dancing around a flame. However, Bear believes that once viewers see Indigenous people as a modern culture—as the opposite of the dead Indian—they get upset. Bear feels hopeful about their impact within the community, and that their content sheds light on underrepresented authors, books and content creators.